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Tag Archives: Readmissions

Readmission & The Common Reasons Mary Bommel Shames

October 25th, 2013 | 11

Readmission (10.26.12)With the advent of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obama Care), it is crucial for hospitals to prevent readmissions to the best of their abilities. Under new law, hospitals with an unacceptably high level of readmissions within 30 days can result in financial penalties that many hospitals cannot afford to sustain. 

So, what is causing hospital readmissions? Why are patients who seemed to be well upon discharge being readmitted?

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The Art of the Follow Up Call Christy Rakoczy

May 20th, 2013 | 2

SeniorOnPhoneFollowing up with patients after giving care is a crucial means of developing a strong patient relationship. It is also the key to improving overall patient care and reducing patient readmissions in the hospital setting.

Follow up calls can address a variety of issues. One common type of follow up call is to report lab results. Another type of common follow up call is to schedule appointments. However, calls can also be made to ensure patients have made appointments with referrals or are taking medication appropriately. Other calls may have the purpose of education or reinforcing knowledge. There are myriad factors that could warrant a follow up call to a patient. 

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The Effect of CMS 30 Day Readmission Policies on California Patients and Hospitals Christy Rakoczy

April 14th, 2013 | 0

CaliforniaHealthcareIn 2010 the Affordable Health Care Act was enacted and the process of moving toward full implementation of the Act began. In 2012, the CMS 30 Day Readmission Policy began to be enforced, penalizing thousands of hospitals for readmission of certain patients within a 30 day period. According to CMS.gov, penalty applies to readmissions of patients who had previously been admitted with Acute Myocardial Infection, Heart Failure, or Pneumonia. This penalty, a reduction in reimbursement by Medicare, up to 1%, cost hospitals hundreds of thousands of dollars but some assert that the goal of the policy, to improve follow up healthcare by hospitals to prevent necessary returns by patients, is being achieved as the percentage of readmissions nationwide dropped to 17.8% from the stagnant 19% it had been for several years. 

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Reducing Readmission from Long Term Care Facilities Christy Rakoczy

November 27th, 2012 | 0

StrategyEarlier this month, we offered some Strategies to Reduce Readmission and got a very positive response from readers. So, we’ve decided to expand on our tips and strategies and to provide some specific advice for lowering readmission strategies when releasing patients into specific post-hospital environments. Since so many patients go to long-term care (LTC) facilities after leaving the hospital, we’ll be starting with some tips to reduce readmissions when patients are released into a long-term care situation.   

Tips for Reducing Readmissions from Long Term Care

Long-term care facilities are staffed by medical professionals so in many ways it should be easier to avoid readmission when a patient is released to a facility rather than sent home. Unfortunately, due to a variety of problems including inadequate communication with long-term care facilities; choosing the incorrect facility; and overstaffed and underperforming long-term care providers, readmission rates still remain stubbornly high. In fact, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, approximately ¼ of Medicare beneficiaries discharged into a skilled nursing home were readmitted to hospitals within 30 days, at a cost of $4.34 billion. 

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Strategies to Reduce Readmission Christy Rakoczy

November 7th, 2012 | 1

RevolvingDoorReadmission is a major problem in U.S. hospitals, so much so that Hospital Impact reports that one out of every five Medicare patients is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged.  Hospital Impact reports that these readmissions come at a cost of approximately $17.5 billion each year.

While Fierce Healthcare reports that Medicare has a new policy- called a Readmissions Reduction Program – that docks up to 1 percent of pay for hospitals with high readmission rates, simply penalizing hospitals isn’t the answer. No hospital or rehabilitative care facility wants patients to be sent back into the hospital. The problem, as News Medical reports, is that hospitals are lacking in cohesive strategies to reduce readmission.  Developing a detailed discharge plan, therefore, is a key first step in helping patients to thrive once they’ve left the hospital. So, how can hospitals succeed at doing this? Here are a few tips.

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4 Discharge Tactics To Reduce Senior Readmissions Justin Usher

October 26th, 2012 | 0

ReAdmission_2This post originally appeared here: http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/4-discharge-tactics-reduce-senior-readmissions and was published by Healthcare Finance News.

In light of the recent Readmissions Reduction Program under the Affordable Care Act, numerous hospitals and medical industry experts are examining new approaches that will decrease the rate of hospital readmissions.



“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services estimates $15 billion is spent annually on readmissions for Medicare patients, with $12 billion of that amount being preventable,” said Jeff Huber, president and COO of Home Instead Senior Care, a provider of non-medical in-home care services for seniors. “This is an issue of significant concern to everyone in the healthcare field. There are a number of simple and cost efficient best practices that healthcare organizations can easily implement as they work to decrease the number of unnecessary senior readmissions.”



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REMINDER: Medicare To Penalize 2,211 Hospitals For Excess Readmissions [STARTING TODAY 10/1/12] M.L. Sutton

October 1st, 2012 | 0

ReAdmissionPenaltiesThis post originally appeared here: http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2012/August/13/medicare-hospitals-readmissions-penalties.aspx and was published by Kaiser Health News.

More than 2,000 hospitals — including some nationally recognized ones — will be penalized by the government starting in October because many of their patients are readmitted soon after discharge, new records show.

Together, these hospitals will forfeit about $280 million in Medicare funds over the next year as the government begins a wide-ranging push to start paying health care providers based on the quality of care they provide.

With nearly one in five Medicare patients returning to the hospital within a month of discharge, the government considers readmissions a prime symptom of an overly expensive and uncoordinated health system. Hospitals have had little financial incentive to ensure patients get the care they need once they leave, and in fact they benefit financially when patients don’t recover and return for more treatment.

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How Nursing Homes Can Cut Hospital Readmissions OpenPlacement Admin

September 12th, 2012 | 0

ReAdmissionThis post originally appeared here: http://www.forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2012/09/12/how-nursing-homes-can-cut-hospital-readmissions/ and was published by Forbes.com.

Too many people make the dangerous roundtrip from hospital to nursing facility and back again. These transfers may increase risks of delirium, medication errors, falls, and infection. There is no doubt that some patients die as a result of these transfers. And, they cost payers—Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance—hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

 

The real tragedy: By some estimates as many as 60 percent of these rehospitalizations are preventable.

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