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The Discharge Planner’s Survival Guide: 10 Essential Resources Christy Rakoczy

July 22nd, 2013 | 2

SurvivalGuideWhen planning patients’ discharge it is essential to ensure that best practices are followed. Ensuring that all necessary care has been provided to a patient while hospitalized and identification of needs and resources of the patient after discharge are crucial. In addition, it is imperative that patients are educated on how to care for themselves after being discharged including sharing what appointments will be needed as follow-up, medications and dosage, nutritional needs, and knowing who to contact in the event extra care or community resources are necessary. Finally, it is important to assess the patient’s ability to achieve optimum recovery by understanding needs such as transportation and family support.

There are a variety of tools and resources available to assist discharge planners that have the ability to execute a patient’s discharge effectively. Ten of the top resources are:

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Which Care Transition Model is Best? Christy Rakoczy

April 22nd, 2013 | 2

Which Care Transition Model is Best?Care transition models play a huge role in lowering readmissions. Patients, families, and medical providers depend on these models to answer the “What, When, and Who” during a deterioration in a condition after being discharged. Hospitals have developed these models to point out to patients and their caregivers what red flags to look out for in their medical condition, when to make that call, and who to contact to attain appropriate care. Due to a fragmented healthcare system, the models have provided solutions in unifying medical providers into one system so patients receive timely and non-repetitive aftercare. I have looked into five current care transition models and outlined their differences to help you determine which is best. 

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Clinician Resources to Promote Improved Hospital Discharge Processes Christy Rakoczy

March 7th, 2013 | 0

CareTransitionIn our fast-paced and ever changing world, medical personnel face the challenge of providing quality and personal care to a vast number of patients.  With the number of people being treated in hospitals increasing, it is very important for the discharge process to be as smooth and informative as possible.  Breakdowns in communication between facilities and caregivers during hospital discharge processes can cause serious and sometimes life-threatening situations, and in recent years several resources have been created to prevent such situations from occurring. 

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Understanding and Improving Discharge: A Critical Factor in Reducing Potential For Readmission Christy Rakoczy

January 28th, 2013 | 0

Discharge_1Introduction.  Recent studies have shown that the discharge process can be very difficult.  The challenges of the complex process can easily lead to errors that lead to unnecessary re-hospitalization.  Preventing these both improves the patient’s outlook and prevents care facilities from receiving penalties associated with excessive readmissions.  This report takes a look at the discharge process and some of the data gathered over the last several years as a means of understanding and improving discharge.

The importance of effective discharge planning.  Studies from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality demonstrated that there were more than 39 million discharges in the United States in 1996.  Unplanned re-hospitalizations cost a whopping 17 and a half billion dollars, accounting for nearly a fifth of Medicare’s hospital payments between 2003 and 2004.  The end result, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Readmissions Reduction Program, is that in 2012, about two out of every three facilities received some sort of penalty for excessive readmissions.

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What Social Workers and Discharge Planners Should Know About Medicare Christy Rakoczy

January 3rd, 2013 | 0

Medicare_3Here’s the understatement of the New Year: Medicare can be frustratingly complex for patients and discharge planners alike.  Nevertheless, it is critical for social workers and discharge planners to be in the know about the aspects of Medicare that directly affect their patients and care facilities.  We have compiled a list that, although not exhaustive, highlights some crucial information that discharge planners should be aware of.

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Continuing Care Coordinators Need to Provide Choice for Patients Christy Rakoczy

December 7th, 2012 | 0

ChoiceDoctors and hospitals have certain obligations to provide competent care to patients. This duty of care does not end at the hospital doors. When a patient is discharged, the hospital/healthcare provider has a responsibility to ensure that any discharge plan is made in the best interests of the patient and takes into account the medical needs of the patient. Everyone, from the treating physician to the discharge planner, must take certain steps to ensure that the goals of providing competent care are met even once the patient has left. 

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IN THE TRENCHES: THE DISCHARGE PLANNER Bridging Gaps Between Hospital and Home M.L. Sutton

September 13th, 2012 | 0

DischargePlannerThis post originally appeared here: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/19/health/19tren.html and was published by the NYTimes.com.

Almost as soon as patients are admitted to 9 Silver, a general medicine floor at Beth Israel Medical Center in downtown Manhattan, Alicia Tennenbaum starts planning how to get them to leave.

As a hospital discharge planner, Ms. Tennenbaum is a health care traffic cop, patrolling a wildly busy intersection of medical, economic and social challenges. On 9 Silver, she visits patients who are elderly, impoverished or just reeling from a diagnosis, asking: Do you need a ride home? Do you have a home? Do you need help with shopping, meals? Grab bars in the shower? Physical therapy? Do you have someone who can get you to check-ups?

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